Giselle Act I

Giselle is a wide-eyed innocent girl in love for the first time. She is a bit shy and quiet but very sweet and empathetic. She possesses a rare familial heart condition that prompts her mother to restrict her activities and won’t let her work in the vineyards without her supervision, much to Giselle’s dismay as she would rather be out with her friends than trapped at home. More than anything Giselle loves to dance, which her mother also disparages on account of her condition. In response Giselle is quietly rebellious, sneaking a bit more activity whenever she can. She wasn’t particularly interested in love until the beginning of summer when Loy’s came to work in the vineyards. An unfamiliar curiosity became a timid interest which became a sweeping infatuation and deeply rooted love. Being unexperienced in love she is often blind to Loy’s faults, and her mother’s disapproval of his station only exacerbates her desire to be with him. As summer draw to a close and her friends begin to sense marriage on their horizons, she wonders if the same journey could lie in store for her.
Giselle is sweet and guileless which is reinforced with the white of her dress which also contrasts her with the colors of all the other women in the village and further shows her mother’s interdict not to work in dirty or strenuous business. Her hem mimics a lily shape and foreshadows her death and the lilies that Albrecht will bring to her grave, her collar, like her mother’s, is larger to show the wealth of her forbearers, and her bodice/vest is green to reference common German folk costume colors and to symbolize her life in Act I followed its absence in Act II when she wears all white.

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